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often our conversations about these issues are exclusively engineering and physical science kinds of questions. those matter, no doubt. they're fundamental, but there's a social dimension to this as well, which neighborhoods are affected, which individual people are affected, and it's predictable. >> fascinating, zone "a" ev evacua evacuated, low-lying residents there were twice as likely to be residents of. >>> i want to bring in ed markey, co-sponsor of the only climate bill to ever pass the chamber of congress. congressman, what is your reaction to the stunning absence of this issue that you worked so hard on and labored over and ground out a large bill with tons of technical details to carve votes on and it's now disappeared from the political conversation? >> well, i think that -- i think that mother nature decided that she was going to inject it into this election. if it wasn't going to be raised in any of the debates, then she was going to find a way of having this be discussed. and so this election for next tuesday is now framed. it's mother nature versus the unrestrained
for it. -- to work for it. [applause] we should recruit 100,000 math and science teachers so high- tech jobs -- math and science teachers so high-tech jobs are not created in china but right here in colorado. we should work with community colleges to train another 2 million americans with the skill businesses are looking for now, and that is part of my plan for the future. that is what changes. that is what is at stake in this election. change comes when we live up to america's legacy of innovation, where we make america the next home of scientific discovery when technological breakthroughs. i am proud i met on a mirror -- i'd bet on american ingenuity, and we are not just building cars. we are building better cars that will go twice as far on a gallon of gas. [applause] today there are thousands of workers all across the country. not every technology we bet on will pan out. there is a future for clean energy it in america. i am not going to see the future to another country. i want to create jobs here in america. i want to support the new technologies that will reduce carbon who in our
. but you're quite right that many scientists have been very cautious and science has a cautious culture. you could almost say a conservative culture. their peer review process discourages them from even thinking about going out on a limb. and so they -- they are inherently cautious and conservative. but the evidence is now so overwhelming. you know, in the last ten years you showed some of the statistics but there there's an analysis of the extreme hot temperatures on the surface of the earth. they're now 100 times more common than they were just 30 years ago. and it is these extremely hot temperatures that are responsible for the increased evaporation, the increased water vapor in the air the increased drought. and remember this is hardly the only climate related disaster that we've had this year. 65% of the united states has been affected by a very widespread and extreme drought this year. food prices have been affected. much of the west, including the epic fire in colorado springs was on fire this summer
. our site is doing it because their cars get keyed and science get torn down. >> hi, my name is harry. i love your passion and your honesty all these years. i've seen you on media. and david, i admire him so deeply. mainly for that day she was going be campuses and taking them on right there in those places. i was a student in 1965 at kersten university and i was drawn by democrats into democrats into wanting to help take care of people are hearing the clarence thomas hearings, i switched to republican. the >> that's great. >> after the republicans inability to prosecute clinton all the way, i let them and became an independent and decided that was the best place i could find. i loved what you said about the courage of the black conservative. that's the subject i've been drawn to from the very beginning. it was in my heart in those days as a student, when i was in the march to montgomery, where it all got started. >> is this leading to question? >> i have value of my own, too. i wanted you to comment on the person of thomas soul if you don't mind. [applause] >> i think is the greatest
of the social science research institute and a co-organizer of the research is here today. susan, can you please stand to be recognized? thank you. [applause] we also made a pledge to educate the university community about ethics. it's one thing to know the rules, regulations, and policies; it's another thing to create a culture where every employeements to do the right thing the first time every time. through training and awareness building efforts, we're trying to help people understand the how, when, where, and why of reporting. i assure you that penn state takes this commitment very seriously. that's not a glib promise. to prove it, we stepped up efforts in compliance. like most universities, penn state has dozens of compliance professionals. they're responsible for ensuring research funds are appropriately used, they monitor the nca compliance, the financial reporting, conformity to federal laws covering privacy rights and crime reporting, and they administer regulations related to the health, welfare, and safety of those on campuses including our patients. what we've discovered, however, i
is sort of the science of the campaign. the obama campaign has its ground game down to precise numbers, who they have to turn out where, they're spending so much time and money figuring this out. that's science. the romney campaign is passion, energy, they're coming on, their campaign seems a little more excited. part of that's the nature of being a challenger versus an incumbent running a re-election. depending on which city you're in, boston or chicago, you come out with two different -- both make really compelling cases for themselves. the polls are tight enough that either one could be totally not spinning and believing it, but who knows? >> who knows? >> tom brokaw, just final thoughts in the final days of the campaign, how much should the events matter? then you've got the science of the campaign muddled by the storm. >> well, if nothing happens that is unexpected between now and then, the scenario is going to be does the romney wave override the obama ground game and getting out the vote? the romney people have been counting on what happened with reagan, as you know, in 1980. di
in science, technology, engineering and math. what would you suggest be done to produce more graduates in those areas? >> moderator: this will go first to mr. howell. howell: this is right up my alley, val. i love technology. i think this is the greatest thing. we have to start in preschool. we have to emphasize that science, technology, engineering, math are key to growing our economy. but i'd also add in the a word, and that's art. you know, at ibm some of our very finest software developers that create the apps that we all use are very, very culturally-aware, and they're the artsy ones. but they take the science and technology. we've got to invest in beginning in preschool and going all the way through k-12. from the federal government, no child left behind left everyone behind. we need to take those dollars and reinvest them back into our education system near utah today. >> moderator: senator hatch. hatch: there's a lot of what scott said here is true, and i appreciate him saying it. and we in utah are known for one of the best software valleys in the country. i'm the republican h
to study. math and science. and english. exactly, yeah. i did not go to university, but being able to help them, i feel excited. >> i am going to be an accountant. >> i'm going to be a lawyer. >> and i'm going to be a nurse. >> the work that we're doing here is bringing change. >>> if there is one good thing about this storm it's that you can get evacuation information, all kinds of information through a lot of different sources. i'm going to tell you how you can do that online. we're downstairs in the cnn newsline. usually not that busy on a sunday night. we brought some people in. tom, one of the managers, and devon, i'm sorry, i had your e-mail up on the air. now he's getting random e-mails from everywhere. stop e-mailing devon. you can get information from tv news conferences, twitter feeds. we want to go to cnn's lori sau segall standing by for us in new york. >> reporter: a lot of people going to nyc.gov. i would say go to wnyc, this is important if you're in the new york area, in the northeast region, you can really look at the different zones. see what zone you're in. i went to it
the deficit and still make investments in things like education and training, science and research, and, guess what, plenty of folks who were running for congress at the time said it would hurt the economy, that it would kill jobs, and if that argument sounds familiar, one of those candidates back then happens to be running for president right now. and it turns out their math was just as bad back then as it is today. because by the end of bill clinton's second term, america had created 23 million new jobs, and incomes were up and property was down, and our deficit became the biggest surplus in our history. wisconsin, we know the ideas that work. we also know the ideas that don't work. in the eight years after bill clinton left office, his policies were reversed. americans got tax cuts they didn't need. companies got tax breaks for shipping jobs overseas. oil companies and wall street were given free license to do what they pleased. folks, at the top got to play by a different set of rules than the rest of us. the result of this top-down economics was falling income, record deficit, the slowest
people so they can get decent jobs and start growing again. to invest in science and technology and research. that's a better economic plan than one more round of tax cuts spending by a 22% cut on on education, science, and technology. it is bad for youngstown state, and obama's plan is better for the future of america. obama's education plan is better for the future of america. he is committed to hiring 100,00 0 new science, technology, and math teachers. committed to cutting the rate of inflation of college costs in half and to the student loan reform program, the single most important thing nobdody knows about. this alone justifies his reelection if you believe in the future. the old student loan system worked like -- the federal government paid the banks to make loands and guaranteed 93% of the loans. the new system -- under that old system, it meant we dropeped to 16th in the world in college degrees. a perscription for disaster. almost every job is created by someone with a degree. we can't afford to be 16th in the world. so what did the president and congress do? what did
is committed to hiring 100 and thousand new science and technology teachers in our schools. committed to cutting the rate of inflation cut in half and committed to the student loan program. [applause] the old student loan system works like this. the federal government pays the bank a fee to make loans and the guaranteed 90% worth of loans. the new system works like this. under that old system, we dropped to 16 in the world with our young people with college degrees. it is a recipe for disaster. we cannot afford to be 16th in the world. what do the president and congress do? they passed laws to change the system. the government sets aside a loan reserve saying these are the ones eagle for loans. starting next year, everyone in the country gets one of these loans will have the absolute right to pay back as a low fixed percent of their income. think about this. [applause] what that means is nobody ever has to worry whether they cannot pay their loans. if he get out of college and you want to go teach in a small town in ohio or the salaries are low, you can do it anyway for a few years be
systems to integrate social media and data visualization tools with social science, analysis. his writing has appeared in the asian "wall street journal," foreign policy, he's been interviewed by major news organizations around our world. it's my pleasure to welcome to the stage here in gaston hall, dr. kim. [applause] >> thank you for your kind introduction, president john degoiia. the korea economic institute is very honored to be a cosponsor of the distinguished panel of the united states current and past assistant secretaries of state for east asian and pacific affairs. i can think of no better partners than the edmonds school of foreign services and president john degoiia and georgetown university to share this unique platform to explore the future of the united states policies in the asia-pacific. i really do think that the 21st century will be seen as an asia-pacific century, much of the economic dynamism and growth will emerge from this region. and, of course, many of the toughest global challenges as well. the rise of china, the prospects of asian economic integration, and, of co
financial crisis. he has worked to develop new systems and data visualization tools with social science analysis. his writing has appeared in "the wall street journal." it is my pleasure to welcome to the state chair dr. kim. [applause] >> take you for your kind introduction. but the korean economic institute is honored to be a co- sponsor of this panel of the united states current and past assistant secretaries of state for east asian affairs. i can think of no better partners than the amend school of foreign services and the president and georgetown university to share this platform to explore the future of the united states policies in the asia-pacific. i think that that 21st century will be seen as the asia-pacific century. much of the economic dynamism and grit will emerge from this region. many of the toughest gruel challenges as well. the rise of china, the prospects of asian economic integration, and the scurvy problems on the korean peninsula. u.s. leadership and continuous engagement in this region will be critical in these and many more issues ahead. as the president of the e
. what is a superstition? >> a belief or an action that is inconsistent with science. it needs to be aimed at bringing about good luck or avoiding bad luck. >> reporter: count yourself lucky if you're not superstitious. connecticut college psychologist stewart says most people are. in a world where we prize science, it may not be something to be proud of. >> i think only 40% of americans believe in evolution. >> reporter: what percent of americans believe in superstition. >> over half of americans have some kind of superstition that they believe in. >> reporter: so more americans have some specific superstition than believe in he have heution. >> that's right. that's not a good thing. >> reporter: a new cbs news poll for sunday morning finds more than half of all americans, knock on wood to avoid bad luck. 16% won't open up as indoors. 13% carry a good luck charm. and one in ten avoids black cats. at halloween we even have a holiday that celebrates our superstitions. nowhere are they celebrated more than here at the blood manor haunted house in new york city where you're surrou
and write a political science book and i would go down and live by angie in florida. it is the case that for better than 30 years, it was not just republican and democrat. i suspect the point of this question is that it is grassley and harkin. is safe and fair to say that they both represent the core beliefs of their two parties. this is what we call a truce wednesday. that is how this state operates. -- this is a true swing state. it is not the case when barack obama wins these electoral votes, this will not turn i will blue. -- i know what will not turn blue. his victory will ensure a retention and expansion of the state senate majority which will bring house seats and it is part of a strategy that actually can put us on a possible path to win all four congressional seats. two years from there will be another battle to hold those gains. this is a very independent- minded state. we are not split east and west. it is really in the four corners. they are absolutely the face of this thing. host: barbara, and dependent caller, the morning. -- independent caller. caller: i did not vote
this election will look at what went wrong and what went right, after this. it is science and they are very talented people. a lot of times they are very accurate. i will say that, it you are for one candidate or another, there is your own emotions that play into this sometimes, if so you will see a poll that maybe is not favorable to you and your party and sometimes your emotions can play into it. for the most part, particularly with these averages, they are generally accurate. host: we did a segment yesterday about understanding polls during the campaign season. if your interested, go to c- span.org and we have the pew research director talked about how and why polls are done. now to thomas in little home, texas, republican -- in little elm. caller: i want to know, for everyone out there, i know people that go to college, whether their parents paid for it or day paige ford themselves, they're very proud they went to college. i cannot figure out why obama, and his wife, have hidden their records and sealed them. guest: well, i don't want to comment directly on that, necessarily, but i will
keep being climate change designers and anti-science in a variety of ways. >> anti-science, we are still dealing with 46 million people on food stamps. we are still dealing with a 50% increase in the national debt and 100% increase in the gasoline price. now, in new jersey, they can only get 10 gallons. we are dealing with a lot of economic problems. >> part of what sandy tells us, yes, we are dealing with all of those things. that's not somehow separate about trying to get a laugh line by talking about the rising ocean. >> everybody wants to see c-130s unloading electric trucks to help them. they expect the government to show up. it is what level the government takes irresponsibilities. not enough time to see what this storm has done. >> if we keep thinking of government's response as only about response after the fact rather than thinking about the money that is saved and the policies and the fairness associated with doing disaster planning through fair governorer nance in the first place. >> you are talking about wanting a cop to do on the job. what melissa is talking about
, no matter what happens which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense from td ameritrade. >> eliot: even ceos like jamie dimon are saying it. mitt romney's tax cuts be disastrous i'm be on realtime with bill maher 10:00 p.m. eastern tonight on hbo. an informed electorate. our country's future depends on you. to help you make informed decisions, watch current tv's politically direct lineup. only on current tv. take the time to learn about the issues. don't just vote, vote smart. >> eliot: have mitt romney and his anti-tax rasputin grove norquist finally met their match? for years norquist has almost single-handedly led our congress down a destructive one-dimensional path of refusal to consider any revenue increases as part of meaningful fiscal policy. he has ham strong every effort to address long term issues. the basic inequities of our tax code the failure to invest sufficiently in the building blocks of our future, entitlement reform or the deficit. the effort to restore the tax rate at the wealthiest americans who have thrived over the past several years even as others have bor
't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >> sean: as both candidates head into the final stretch of the campaign there is one critical state that could hold the keys not white house for governor romney and that is the state of ohio. historically no republican candidate has won the election without taking this battleground state. the latest poll shows governor romney in a dead heat with the president both at 48% and as obama is relying mainly on the quote auto bailout for a victor arery in the state, voters are more concerned about the overall economy. romney is leading obama when it comes to the handling of the economy. joining us is michael barone. what do you think? >> what is happening in ohio? well, this was one of the three firewall states. the obama campaign wanted to concentrate on three states where they got the lowest winning percentages in 2008 except for indiana and north carolina which they conceded, florida, ohio and virginia. since the october 3 debate, florida seems to be gone toward mitt romney. he has been winning almost all polls this. vir
of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> sean: joining me are two men trying to get to the bottom of the lies and coverup. so we just heard from charles woods the father of this american hero. here is a navy seal he s a mile away he is not at the consulate. he hears the cries for help. he is told to stand down twice. he puts his military career, his life in jeopardy and then gives his life because he is not -- and saves about what, 30 people. how is it possible that -- and he was killed 7 hours later. how is it possible congressman issa that everybody was requesting help before and during and no help came. how is that possible? >> as you know, our men and women in uniform believe that you respond and you don't believe people out there unprotected and certainly don't leave people behind. he was doing the right thing and i think his father deserves to be outraged that 7 hours passed and while overhead predator aircraft could see what was going on no aircraft, no is support was brought in to protect these men and women that could ha
first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. you walk into conventional mattress store, it's really not about you. we have so much technology in our store to really show the customers what's going on with their bodies. this is your body there. you can see a little more pressure in the shoulders and in the hips. ... now you can feel what happens as we raise your sleep number setting and allow the bed to contour to your individual shape. oh, wow. that feels really good. at sleep numr we've created a collection of innovations dedicated to individualizing your comfort. the sleep number collection, designed around the innovative sleep number bed - a bed with dualair technology that allows you to adjust to the exact comfort your body needs. each of your bodies. so whatever you feel like, sleep number's going to provide it for you. during our semi-annual sleep sale, save $500 on our classic series special edition bed set-but only while supplies last. sale ends soon! you'll only find the innovative sleep number bed at one of our 400 st
what the record and science say about the but secular course this storm is taking. -- of the particular course the storm is taking. >> what makes every storm unique is a combination of things, the time of year, strength of the structure in magnitude and size. sandy is unique in a number of ways. it is certainly not common for a system to come in at this strength. but if you look back in history, tropical cyclones have come up the east coast many times in the past. the whole east coast is vulnerable to storm surges and hurricanes. look at isabel in 2003 that came in a little bit further south and had all the storm surge. it has taken a different path, going it in a different direction than this one is. every storm is unique. this is not 100 percent unprecedented, but certainly not common to have a system of this magnitude coming from this direction at this time of year, and what makes this nearly unprecedented and very unusual is the transition to oppose best tropical cyclone and all the different hazards you have in one time. >> i think this is the only time i know of with the hurricane
and i built a solar car that we raced across the united states. this is not rocket science, folks. this industry has been around a long time. it just requires political leadership. political leadership that my opponent is not willing to exercise. >> the political leadership came from the president of the united states. we both agree coal must be part of america's energy future. it is low cost, it is much cleaner than it was 30 years ago, and i am and all the above energy kind of gal. the energy costs about 5 cents a kilowatt hour. currently, solar energy is four or five times that much. if coal is the fuel of the past, reasonably priced electric bills are a thing of the past. i'm going to fight for those jobs and i will fight for low- cost energy. >> ok. that concludes the first half of our debate. we will take a 60-90 second non- commercial break and we'll be right back with you. thank you. [applause] >> we will go ahead and get the second part of the debate started. as i mentioned, the situation will be reversed in terms of the questioning. the first part of the second half of t
, climate change is not even gotten talked about. having all this freakish weather and all the science is so overwhelming about climate, yet you don't see it on the nightly news. is there a story that you wanted to grab of stuff during your tenure at abc in say, we have to cover this war? >> there were several we have had discussions about. actually, one of them was the environment and how we cover the environment. every time we tried to do a prime-time special we would not get a rating, and that led -- one of the chapters are right about this, where i don't come across well, we had leonardo dicaprio at one point, president clinton, and i get killed for it. i did not intend, but we did a prime-time environmental special , and dicaprio was the chairman of earth day that year, and we talk to my that he would make an appearance at the end -- ended up interviewing the president. that was an attempt to try to cover the environment and a serious way and drive an audience. i was concerned, frankly, about our terrorism coverage. we did more than other people did. john miller, our correspondent went
social media and data visualization tools with social science analysis. his write ago peer in the asian "the wall street journal," foreign policy, he's been interviewed by major news organization around our world. it's my pleasure to welcome to the stage here dr. kim. [applause] >>> thank you for your kind introduction. the curry economic institute is hon snored to be a cosponsor of the distinguished panel of the united states current and past assistant secretary of state for east asian and pacific affairs. i can think of no better partner than the edmund school of foreign services and georgetown university to share this unique platform to explore the future of the united states policies in the asia-pacific. i really i do do think that the 21st century will be seen as asia-pacific century. many of the growth will merge from the region and of course many of the toughest global challenges as well. the rise of china, the perspective of asian integration and the security problems on the korean peninsula to name a few. u.s. leadership and continuous engagement in the region will be critical
sector and it has helped natural gas investment here with the marcellis shale. life sciences, education, health care. this is growing a lot due to the president's policies. he has had to combat the governor and many members of chairman gleason's party who have tried to stymie that growth. we want to see those policies take hold in continue to grow. one other issue he spoke about, the voter i.d. law, there is still confusion in the commonwealth. the severed by the republican party in pennsylvania and for governor corbett's administration to confuse people, which they do not, is something that i think was votes. i'm not suggesting that was his motive, but it is the motive of some republican. it is unconstitutional. people who want to vote, if they do not have an id, they can still go to the polls and have their constitutional records looked at. host: do you want to respond? guest: they will be asked for their photo id. the use of photo id has been accepted by both parties. it is something that is absolutely critical since terrorists attacked us. and homeland security. the right thing to d
, schools give a break to students who major in math and science and those are most needed for florida's job market and undergrads studying political science, they have fewer job prospects in the state. >> alisyn: lady liberty. >> cool. >> alisyn: the statue's 126 anniversary and the celebration opening up to the public after a year long renovation and 30 million dollar project including remodeling the staircase to make it easier for visitors to climb and to climb, that was tough. and 26,000 more people visit each other. >> you climbed up and only made it up to the commissar i. >> alisyn: i was exhausted. >> clayton: can i get a coffee? and they put an elevator in there for handicapped individual who never before had a chance to go up and see a portion of the statue of liberty. today it could be open until it's closed later today by the federal government because of-- and meanwhile we have been talking over the last month what happened on september 11th of this year in libya. of course, our ambassador, a member of the embassy staff and two former navy seals were killed. jennifer griffin had
.i.h., the national science foundation, so i would take issue with the fact that, you know, the republic of texas is making it all on their own. they're getting substantial benefits from federal research and development dollars. which is fine. i don't have any problem with that at all. but to benefit from the oil industry in such a profound way is a unique situation. we don't have that situation every y -- everywhere. but texas does benefit from nasa, from the national science foundation and the national institutes of health. that's helped spur their economy as well. >> congressman, gary on twitter wants me to ask you, why didn't obama stick his neck out for the nonunion workers who lost their peppings in the auto bailout. can you talk that out? >> that's an urban legend. we are working, nart brown and i are working very hard to help the seven or eight splinter unions that didn't end up doing as well as the u.a.w., the iue crferings wa which had contracts essential to the development of the new general motors. but this is not a union-nonunion issue. there were seven or eight different unions that
political science data saying women tend to do better when a democrat is in office on all of these things. are the democrats making the argument they need to make to these broad group of women? >> republicans had a very specific strategy this year which is try to force white voters, including married white women, to really choose more than ethnicity and more their class and not pay attention to issues that would be considered women's issues. but what i think is interesting is how few republican women have been out front. you showed all those clips. very few republican women, including white republican women, had been willing to do the vanguard for these issues about gender. specifically about women. and they haven't been able to sort of create a coalition of republican women who will argue this. i think they're even offended by it. the republicans have been successful at least in cleving off a certain percentage of married women. but i question whether or not those polls are going to be sort of played out on election day the same way. i think a lot of women privately, including republican
reason. i don't know whether that's because how computer science is conducted in universities or i'm not with larry summers that i think it's all social and not physical. and on the other financial literacy. well, we didn't address that here because we're only looking at earnings and not at income from financial assets. we purposely made that decision to focus on earnings. as it is, that's an issue for the top 20% of the country. 93% of the value of all financial assets, includes pensions and retirement accounts and savings accounts and stocks and bonds all financial assets which is to say that every asset in the economy except homes. that's -- and art and gold or whatever. are held by the top 20% of the country. but financial literacy in the top 20%, i think does have an effect on ultimate in come. would it be a good idea to have greater financial literacy across income distribution? absolutely, and it would be better to figure out a way and there are lots of ways to do it for average people to accumulate assets other than their own homes. >> baby bonds, but that is another subjec
subsidies anymore. the national academy of sciences has said that any level of radiation from a nuclear power plant is dangerous to our health. so we need to be moving forward. the costs of nuclear power are socialized, and the health care costs that we have are people that are exposed to radiation. i do support, i support governor cuomo's efforts and to support a transition to renewable clean energy economy, and save economy that does not rely on fossil fuels or nuclear power. >> moderator: dan maffei, would you support what the governor wants to do by closing indian point? maffei: there's no question we have to get to work towards a clean energy a comic book we're doing a lot of that research right here in central new york, our universities or at the clean tech center, at the tech garden. in terms of nuclear power, well, we do need to make sure that nuclear power is safe and make sure that it's environmentally sound. i'm not sure we done that yet, but it wouldn't get rid of it until a gotten rid of coal and oil first. oil that we're dependent on other countries for, that we are behold
. there was a very controversial position i took at the time. i am going to be driven by the science. i agree with what mr. gregg said. the natural resources defense council ranked two of the beaches among best in the country for two years in a row. >> do have any advice on how to deal with these issues in the state? >> one of the students is my daughter. she is interested in these issues. i think delaware is a tremendous place. we have beautiful places, a beautiful environment and we have to work hard to make sure we're protecting that. i think a great environment is a bonus in terms of economic development. gov. peterson past the coastal zone act. people thought that was an economic -- it was an anti-jobs. it turned out to be the opposite. because we have such a beautiful delaware bay, businesses want to be here. that is why we're fake -- focused on the bayshore initiative. one of the objections i have is the thing of the power plant in the coastal zone. the pollutants are sulfur trade we have done is we have waived the requirement to put that manufacturing facility in the coastal zone. we
it's science, it's math, and it's urgent. thank you. >> moderator: you're welcome. talk about health care. moving on to another question, and starting with you, this time, mr. dalton. affordable care act provides candidates teases to affordable health care to millions of americans. critics say it's expensive, takes money from medicaid, and pushes government on people. what do you like or not like about the affordable care act? dalton: access to affordable care is what i like, and what's wrong with the -- what happened here is that the two parties again, democrats and republicans, who i hope i replace by more independents so they are held accountable to be in the pockets of major lobbyists, they doabts come to reform when it comes to the major issues. to allow major lobby groups like big pharmaceuticals, the u.s. chamber of congress, ama, and even aarp, to get in the room and force them to make requirements that are not for the best interest of the people, the reason we have a mandate was because that was forced down their throat. the reason we have -- we don't have a public option, w
well this is clearly climate change now. this is not how science works. >> you can't point to one storm, because there've been serious storms historically in the past. but, i think it's also undeniable that our climate is changing. i mean, science has proven that. i mean, overall, so i think that it's undeniable that what we are doing as people to the environment is changing the way our climate impacts us. and we're going to have to take this very seriously. and that's why it's important that government acts responsibly to regulate environmental issues. >> richard socarides, will cain. thanks for coming in this morning. >> still ahead, the travel chaos caused by sandy. so much of it, one major new york airport still under water. >> can you believe it? look at that. >> cnn's richard quest will have all of that information for us and what you can look for today. >> and when will it reopen, right? >> will it reopen? you're watching "early start." r. double miles you can actually use... but mr. single miles can't join his friends because he's getting hit with blackouts. shame on you. now he
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. (vo) john fugelsang sees what happens. >> you know, blaming this economy on barack obama is kinda like blaming your hangover on the guy making breakfast. i like mitt romney but i'm sorry. they guy has flipped more than a crack house mattress. this campaign has become so toxic, beverly hills housewives are now injecting it into their foreheads. (vo) so current gave him a weekly show. >> i love romney's debate style, but i tell you, if i could be that stiff for 90 minutes, i'd ... (vo) we probably won't regret it. [ ♪ theme ♪ ] >> announcer: heard around the country and seen on current tv. this is the bill -- "bill press show." >> bill: good morning, it is monday october 29th the day that hurricane sandy is expected to hit the east coast. we were just talking with james hohmann with the romney campaign. a lot of newspaper endorsements over the weekend. >> i'm sorry, what is a newspaper? >> bill: yeah, exactly. the des moines regis
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